Using human soaps on dogs

Many pet owners are faced with the quandary of whether using human soaps on their dogs is safe or not. Sure, dog soaps and shampoos are widely available, even though there is much debate on whether human soaps can be used to bathe our furry friends or not.

Generally, people do not recommend using human toiletries (including shampoos and soaps) on dogs. This is because of the high pH levels of canines. And using human soaps on them can cause the breakdown of their natural oils.

However, the natural variety of human soaps is seen as a good choice for dogs; their use on the canines does not irritate their skin. They can help to keep your pets squeaky clean, too.

Here we have listed some human-oriented soaps that are considered safe to use on your furry pets.

Castile

You can use Castile soaps for bathing your dogs. They are free of detergents and composed of plants and oils. Further, these soaps do not contain surfactants, which have a sudsing effect and can break down the natural oils on the dog’s skin. Rather Castile soaps contain surfactant-free vegetable oils – like almond oil and olive oil. As such, they can help in eliminating ticks, fleas, and dirt particles – all this without affecting the bodily natural oils of your dog.

Castile soaps are available in liquid form and in a range of sweet-smelling scents. Only dilute them in water, as per the given instructions on the bottle, when heading to bathe your dogs with these soaps.

Glycerin

The unscented varieties of glycerine soaps are known as ‘casting soap’. But, do not confuse these soaps with the Castile ones. Unlike Castile soaps, glycerin is solid in form and translucent in nature. You can avail them in different colors and scents as well.

Even so, bear in mind that some glycerine soaps contain detergents; their use on your dog is not advisable. Rather opt for the glycerine soaps that are plant-based and contain natural ingredients. Further, the general recommendation is to always read the labels before your purchases. Additionally, look for details on the bottle whether they are safe for dog use beforehand.

Know that similar to Castile soaps, the unadulterated glycerine soaps are low-sudsing. You can use them to bathe your dog and be assured that they will not strip natural oils from your dog’s coat.

Pine Tar

Pine tar soaps are old-fashioned ones but considered to be healthier than their modern counterparts. Dog groomers, experts, enthusiasts recommend using these soap varieties. More so, if your pet dog is suffering from skin conditions, then using pine-tar soaps can give them the much-needed relief.

Also, pine-tar soaps are hand-made and filled with natural ingredients. Hence, do not worry about your pet’s pH levels being disrupted with their usage. Nonetheless, read the instructions on the labels and buy only the safe ones. Some brands are specially designed for dogs and these are your best bet.

Recommended Precautions

Note that the natural varieties of human soaps are safe only to bathe dogs. And you must make sure that your dog does not ingest them. Sure, these soaps are non-toxic, though they can cause harm to your dog if they consume them.

For example, consuming Castile soaps by dogs can cause intestinal problems in them. Besides, the essential oils in the soaps can be poisonous upon consumption.

Furthermore, glycerine is used to make laxatives, in addition to soaps. And eating glycerin can give rise to another spate of issues. All the same, pine-tar soaps have some quantities of poisonous substances (like lye and creosote) and their consumption should be avoided too.

In all, go ahead and bathe your dog with natural human soaps. Though, keep them in a place that is not accessible to your dog. Remember to be safe rather than sorry!

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